JCICS: What Does $120,000 A Year Buy You?

As you can see here, as of 2010, it bought you the time (for what it is worth) and efforts (such as they may have been) of Thomas Difilipo. Note he’s the only person with any listed compensation-is JCICS a “one man show” of some kind?

jcics_page

This is from a 2010 disclosure made by JCICS-why do they not have something on file for 2011?

JCICS stands fro “Joint Council on International Children’s Services” -but what does this mean? What is JCICS “joint” with? What are these councils?

At the end of the day, it sounds like a pretentious and pompous name for a trade association for adoption agencies.

JCICS, like agencies such as EAC, IAG and AAC (often referred by FRUA as “the big three Russian adoption agencies”) has been running about like a beheaded chicken over the Russian ban on American adoptions. And, with about as much effectiveness. The agencies, by Russian law, have had to close down their Russian programs. There is nothing they, JCICS or Mr. Difilipo can do about the ban. The so-called “soft diplomacy” mentioned on the JCICS website, if it happened at all, was a waste of time and effort.

Instead of looking for ways to create a cartel of adoption agencies by banning independent adoptions, JCICS should have looked into ways of responding Russia’s concerns. These include means of checking on adopted children, getting appropriate penalties for adopted children, and deterring, if not outright eliminating the violation of certain countries’ laws on the despicable practice of photolisting.

JCICS did not do these things. Russia has banned adoptions by Americans. JCICS constituency, the adoption agencies, may well reconsider the need to belong to JCICS and Mr. Difilipo may be hard put to find a source for his salary.

The Russian Adoption Agreement And The Russian Adoption Ban

It appears as though Russia wants to keep the adoption agreement in place for a year. This is, undoubtedly, to allow Russia to monitor Russian children in the United States.

Even though the agreement will remain in force, it does not, in any way, reverse the ban on the adoption of Russian children by Americans that came into force on January 1, 2013.

The ban is a reaction to many things, including the Magnitsky Act, improper practices of adoption agencies and advocacy groups, and lax treatment of parents who have abused children adopted from Russia.

Organizations serving as trade associations for adoption agencies, such as FRUA and JCICS have had no success whatsoever in lifting the ban or even obtaining information about its implications.

 

March 2013: Day of Reckoning

In March of 2013, Russia will begin the process of re-accrediting adoption agencies. This means that there is no such thing as “permanent” accreditation! All bets are off in March.

It wil be interesting to see how many former players remain eligible, and how many new agencies are allowed to work in Russia.

 

 

The Ratification Process

The Russian-American bilateral adoption agreement has been passed by the lower house of the Russian legislature, which is called the Duma.

Now, it goes for further review and debate in the upper house, which is called the Federation Council. The Federation Council does not reconvene until September of 2012.

Note that many laws are never even considered by the Federation Council. Also note that if any change enters the agreement, it must be sent back to the United States for approval.

If and when the agreement is cleared by the Federation Council, it must then be signed by President Putin.

Given controversies over issues such as the Ranch for Kids and photo listings of kids, it is not clear the remaining ratification steps will proceed quickly. Pay close attention to the fact that it took almost a year to the day to get it to the first step.

The final step is for the US and Russia to get together and try to work out how the agreement will be implemented. If it is true the Russians want powers of inspection of children and retroactive effect, this could be a while in coming.

 

 

EAC and Margaret Cole: Another FAILED Prediction!

Have a look. This is from the EAC blog.

It should not have been too very hard for EAC and Margaret Cole to know that Russia had an election in March.

But, then they made a guess. What guess? That the bilateral agreement on adoptions (Russian Duma bill 45441-6) “may” be ratified after that. Did they have details on that, or was it just an unlucky guess?

Why unlucky guess? Well, as is now about as well documented a fact as there is, the agreement not only hasn’t been ratified, but it seems that if ratification is going to happen at all, it is going to happen in the very distant future. We may have flying cars in fact before it passes.

This is bad news for EAC and some other agencies. It means they have to remain competitive when in fact what they would dearly love to have is a monopoly. Well the only monopoly they get is one with a Boardwalk.

Sorry Margaret Cole, better luck next time, but for now, you can add another “EPIC FAIL” to your list of accomplishments.

 

Russia Delays Ratification of US-Russian Bilateral Adoption Agreement

The Russian parliament (Duma) has decided to defer the ratification of the bilateral adoption agreement indefinitely. The agreement, Russian bill 45441-6 was signed in July of 2011.

Various reports indicated that it might be ratified at some point in 2012, but this seems very unlikely.

The Russian government is disappointed by lack of US action to prosecute abusers of children adopted from Russia. Ready examples come in the form of a horrific tale of death by immolation of a child in Nebraska and “intolerable” delays in the Cherokee, Georgia trial of accused child rapist, Michael Grismore.

As a result, the Russian government is pushing for broader powers to inspect Russian children in their adoptive US homes and possibly return children to Russia based on these inspections. Also, the Russian government has called for the extradition of those both accused and convicted of abusing children adopted from Russia.

The Russian government has noted that the agreement, as drafted will almost certainly require modifications before it could be ratified. Such modifications, will require the assent of the United States. The Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs does not believe that the possibility of such assent even exist until after the US Presidential election in November 2012 and the formation of a new government in 2013.

In the interim, various Russian officials have called for a freeze on adoptions in order to apply pressure to the United States. There is a growing perception that the US components of the agreement were designed to favor certain adoption agencies. Some of these agencies are engaged in practices antithetical to the objectives of the Russian government. The Russian government, realizes that its partner in the agreement, the Department of State, lacks enforcement authority over US based agencies and therefore seeks to apply pressure to instill a modicum of self policing among said agencies.

 

Families Through International Adoption (FTIA): Agency Adoption for a Pedophile!

Yes, that’s right.

This agency, Families Through International Adoption (FTIA), operated by attorney, Keith Wallace, did just that! They let a single man, pedophile Matthew Mancuso, adopt a young Russian girl. Not only did Mancuso abuse her, he made pornography of her.

Surprisingly, despite Mancuso’s conviction and rather embarrassing congressional testimony from both Wallace and his coordinator, New Jersey resident, Sergei Dymtchenko, FTIA remains licensed in Russia.

What a wonderful addition to the adoption cartel they will make. Not only will prices go up, but it seems that if pedophiles and pornographers want to adopt, they might just still be able to do it.

You can read more about this here.